Snowboard's technical specifications

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You've always wondered how a snowboard is composed, what are the differences between the different types of snowboard, such as the camber? Providing more details on the subject, Philippe, Snowboard Product Manager, will explain everything!

 

When choosing your snowboard or talking with fellow snowboarders, it is important to familiarise yourself with some technical terms such as shape, rocker, flex, torsion and pop.

 


The shapes

When speaking of "shape", this is in reference to different snowboard shapes. There are two main shapes, with extremely different features:

 

DIRECTIONAL SHAPE

TWIN TIP SHAPE

For

- GREATER GRIP

- GREATER DIRECTIONAL CONTROL

For

- RIDING IN BOTH DIRECTIONS

- REMAINING BALANCED WHEN rotating

NOTHING IS SYMMETRICAe

EVERYTHING IS SYMMETRICAL

1 - The nose is straighter

1 - The width of the nose and tail is the same

2 - The setback is X mm, hence

 

- The board points of contact with the snow are set back by X mm in relation to the board

 

- The bindings are also set back by X mm

 

2 - There is no setback

 

- The board points of contact with the snow are set back by X mm in relation to the board

 

- • The bindings are centered

 

3 - The rigidity (or curve thickness) is not symmetrical

3 - The rigidity (or curve thickness) is completely symmetrical

 


THE CAMBERS

There are 3 main types of cambers: All other cambers on the market and which you may hear of are based upon these (camber wave, flying V...).

 

  • CLASSIC CAMBER

    The basic camber with convex bend (curved upwards). Under pressure, it serves as a spring providing stability at great speed, grip on hard snow and a pop for jumps.

     

    STABILITY / GRIP/ POP

     

     

    When you reach a certain level in fresstyling, a classic camber is much appreciated in order to jump high.

  • REVERSE CAMBER

    A later addition to the snowboard, this camber is designed for Freestyling as it facilitates turns. It also provides great buoyancy in powdery snow.

     

    MANAGEABILITY / TURNING / BUOYANCY

     

    On the contrary, it is less stable at great speeds, provides less grip on hard snow and has less pop.

  • FLAT CAMBER

    The perfect compromise between the classic camber and the reverse camber

     

    Compromise

 

 

 

 

 

 


The rocker

Regardless of camber, rockers can be applied to boards. The long nose enables increased buoyancy in powdery snow and sets the point of contact between the board and snow back, which increases manageability and reduces the contact surface.

 

 

 

 

easy to ride ON-PISTE & OFF-PISTE / BUOYANCY

 

 


The flex

The longitudinal flex primarily serves with carve turns

 

 

  • Flexible
    beginner


     

    Margins of error

     


     

    Grip and hold with turns at great speed

  • rigid
    advanced / carve
     

    Grip and hold with turns at great speed

     


     

    Rapid carving

     

     

    Margins of error

  • medium

    compromise between the 2

 

 

 


The torsion

The rigidity (or flexibility) between the feet.

 

 

 

  • Flexible
    beginner / jibbing (snowpark)

    Very responsive, very manageable with FS (the 2 feet move separately, almost like a skateboard!)

     

    Plenty of margin for edge errors

    Grip and hold with turns at great speed

  • rigid
    advanced to expert / carving or freerideing
     

     

    Grip and hold with turns at great speed

     


     

    Margin for edge errors

  • medium

     

    Compromise

 

 

 

 


The pop

The rigidity or flexibility of the nose and tail.

 

 

  • flexible
    beginner / flat freestyling

    At slow speeds, the board bends and provides rebound = good pop

     

    At high speeds, (or great energy), the board bends greatly but does not rebound = no pop

  • rigid
    expert, heavy weights / freestyle jib, big air
     

    At slow speeds, the board is impossible to deform = no pop

     

    At high speeds, (or great energy), the board bends, and is strong enough to provide a spring effect = good pop

  • medium

     

    Compromise

 

 


The different bases

The two main manufacturing processes::

 

Extruded base:

Provides standard glide, and good resistance over time.

 

Sintered base:

Provides good glide, much more than the extruded base as the manufacturing process includes a higher density polyethylene. It is also more resistant.

 

Philippe TIERCIN
Product manager
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